Yes, people do ride bikes to the grocery

Yes, people do ride bikes to the grocery


The city council recently approved the LA Mobility Plan 2035, which aims to make the streets safer for everyone as well as provide better connections for multi-modal travel. It's an incredibly positive step for the region, yet the auto-centric fear mongering and naysaying is in full force. But the fact is, people will ride (and walk) if the infrastructure is there.
Stop it with the honking

Stop it with the honking


For many reasons, living in Venice is a wonderful thing. Of course you have the great weather and the beach, but it is potentially among the most bikeable and walkable communities in Los Angeles. I say potentially, because it most certainly can be better. And I have a car vs. bike honking video to prove it...
Playa Vista & bicycle network fail

Playa Vista & bicycle network fail


Playa Vista is booming thanks to what is being called Silicon Valley South. New developments have bike lanes on most of the streets, which makes traveling by two wheels much more approachable for many. However, it's kind of an island, as getting there safely from nearby bike paths is quite the challenge.
Get rid of the ‘beg buttons’

Get rid of the ‘beg buttons’


Over time, I’m realizing how much pedestrians in LA are truly second-class citizens compared to cars. Before moving here, I’d often heard a mythology about how respectful cars are towards pedestrians here. But it’s false. So much is stacked against an enjoyable pedestrian experience, it’s incredible. One obvious example of the inequality are the “beg buttons” that by default install  are required to be pushed before a pedestrian can get a light to cross the street. I don’t mean requesting the … read more
A more private Strava

A more private Strava


Strava allows users to set a privacy zone which will hide your exact start or finish location with a 1km circle of privacy. I don't feel as though this is enough, so I discovered an easy way which allows you to expand the hidden area around your home or office.
Second class pedestrians: Venice & Ocean

Second class pedestrians: Venice & Ocean


Unless you walk a lot, you probably don’t realize how often pedestrians are at a disadvantage for getting around compared to drivers in cars. But the fact is, if you do walk, you’ll run into situations time after time after time where pedestrians must go out of their way when cars don’t. Each individual situation might not be horrible, but they add up to strongly tip the balance towards an inferior experience as a pedestrian. One such place is at … read more
Three Stolen Bikes

Three Stolen Bikes


On October 29th, three bikes were stolen out of my garage. They were actually locked to rings on the wall — and the cuts were clean so it looks like some bike thief pros. The CAADX was less than a week old (and I was really loving it). Two of the bikes are pictured, here. I’d appreciate any heads up if you happen to come across one of them on the market. You can reach me via email: johnmont (at) fxguide.com … read more
The start of one car living

The start of one car living


I’ve primarily been blogging about various tech and computer items of interest to me, tossed in with a bit of beer and cycling. But starting today, the site content is undergoing a change with a new equal focus on my cycling, pedestrian, and transit experiences. My firsthand experience has shown me that the time is way overdue that modes of transportation other than the car have a more equal standing with American’s beloved automobile. How did I get to this point? I … read more
A Crosswalk Too Far

A Crosswalk Too Far


Streetsblog draws attention to how the proverbial deck is stacked against pedestrians in our auto-centric culture. I've encountered so many situations here in LA where those who walk are second class citizens, but these are some incredible examples as to how planners don't keep walkers in mind.

Carnegie Road in Cleveland is dreadful. Running just south of downtown, it is so frequently interrupted by highway exits, it’s more of a high-speed off ramp to somewhere else than a part of the city. Chris Stocking singled out this area — Carnegie by East 9th Street — for its utter un-traversibility.

Were one to walk from the Hilton Garden Inn Downtown to the popular Aladdin’s Restaurant on the other side of the street, the journey would be nearly a quarter mile.