Apps I Love: Triage

Apps I Love: Triage


I get an enormous volume of email every day, with several hundred received every 24 hours. Dealing with the volume is minimized a bit by utilizing Gmail filtering, which is absolutely brilliant. When mail is received, it gets filed into various folders such as mailing lists, fxphd support, fxguide press contacts, software development lists, and newsletters. In the filters, I set each to “Skip Inbox”, so they don’t show up in the Inbox. This leaves my inbox count with only … read more
Apps I Love: Alfred

Apps I Love: Alfred


The next offering in the “Apps I Love” series is Alfred, a killer application launcher. If you’ve never used an application launcher before (Quicksilver was a previous standard), they are great for quickly navigating through your system. But the thing about Alfred is that is so much more. With the addition of the PowerPack, it has totally changed the way I get around on my Mac. How does it work? After installing, you’ll have a little hat icon in the … read more
Apps I Love: Fantastical

Apps I Love: Fantastical


It may seem as though I’m calendar-obsessed, but frankly it’s a critical part of what we do in the collaborative workflow of fxguide and fxphd. In the Chicago offices, we have several calendars which we use to track production, term needs, and even my (insane) travel schedule. I also love apps that are cleanly and simply designed — they look great and just work. Put these two things together and I’ve come to rely on an app called Fantastical, which … read more
Using Google Calendar instead of iCloud

Using Google Calendar instead of iCloud


iCloud is still very much in beta, experiencing the loss of several useful features from MobileMe when making the transition to the new platform. A huge shortcoming of Apple’s calendar functionality is that if the person you want to share a calendar with doesn’t have iCloud, you can only share it read only. The fxguide/fxphd crew is OSX-centric, but sharing outside the company becomes problematic. So I’ve shifted the hub of my “calendaring” to Google Calendar. This does involve a … read more
initial thoughts on OS X Lion

initial thoughts on OS X Lion


I’ve been working with OS X Lion installed on my MacBook Pro for the last several weeks and the experience has been incredibly painless. It’s not my main “production” workstation as I’m still using a MacPro tower at work for Nuke (Nuke 6.3v1 does not run under Lion) and Smoke and large scale projects. But I still use various mainstream desktop apps such as Adobe CS5.5 and do my main web development on the MBP. I listed the main apps … read more
a real fcp x press release (from red giant)

a real fcp x press release (from red giant)


While the verdict is definitely out (or in most minds already delivered) about Final Cut Pro X — I’m happy to see this press release from Red Giant. Reading between the lines, it seems as though the new SDK might actually be decent. Maybe I’m reading too much into it, but I’ll be interested to see what develops. As I mentioned in my previous post, living without Colorista II would make Johnny a dull boy…. Portland, OR (June 24, 2011) … read more
final cut x

final cut x


The headline is what I think Apple should have called the app that was released earlier this week. Mark Dascoli (who works for us at fxphd) and I were chatting about this at work. We both felt that much of the whingeing about the new Final Cut X that’s been going on could have been avoided through a more well thought-out roll out that managed expectations through a tiered product line. With all the negativity out there I feel like … read more
leaving the computer at home: email filters

leaving the computer at home: email filters


In the previous installment of this series, I wrote about managing email sync and more importantly the sorting of the hundreds of emails I receive daily into hierarchy of folders. Without any kind of rules-based sorting, it is incredibly difficult to manage and prioritize things considering the sheer volume of email that arrives each day. To recap, that first step was to “move” my local folders into the Gmail hierarchy. When an email arrives in Mail.app on my OS X … read more
leaving the computer at home: email

leaving the computer at home: email


As the summer heats up, I’ve been wanting to ride my bike into work but I don’t want to have to worry about lugging my MacBook Pro along with me. Was there a way I could fairly easily and effectively make sure that each location had each and everything thing I needed? Or at least most everything. There are many ways to sync, backup, mirror, etc, so I went about researching the best ways to make this happen. The first … read more
my new iphone calendar fave

my new iphone calendar fave


Jon Gruber pointed out calvetica on his site. As a lover of Helvetica, what could be better than a clean simple calendar program. Its my new default. Love it. Share Tweet
os x software: launch bar

os x software: launch bar


My OS X software recommendation for this week is Launch Bar, a nifty unobtrusive utility from Objective Development. I’ve grown to appreciate simple utility applications, ones that aren’t bloated with too many features or looks. This app is simplicity at its best. Install it and have it start on log-in.  When you hit a hotkey it’ll bring up a small bar just below the OS X menu bar. Type a couple of letters to find something you’re looking for and … read more
stop messing with my copy/paste

stop messing with my copy/paste


John Gruber’s post on Daring Fireball alerted me to the Tynt service that many web sites are using. What basically happens is that when you visit a Tynt-enabled web site, a javascript is loaded which feeds information of what you copy back to the web site. At some sites, when you paste the text, an attribution gets automatically added…effectively muddling up your copy and paste. I don’t have an expectation of privacy on the web and I understand how my … read more
iPad content

iPad content


I eagerly downloaded the Wired iPad app to check out how it worked. I was disappointed with the layout and navigation. I found myself lost at times as well as innundated by an overwhelming number of advertisements. I’m finding the translation of magazines to iPad to be underwhelming to say the least. It’s not as simple as running content through an inDesign translator in order to prep for distribution. A good discussion of layout can be found on the information … read more